• Cilia MARTIN

    Cilia MARTIN

    Post-doctorante
    Chercheuse associée à l'Observatoire Urbain d'Istanbul

    Thèmes de recherche : (re)composition territoriale, questions minoritaires, socio-histoire des mobilités, socio-histoire de la mémoire, relation urbain/rural.
    Terrains : Turquie, Grèce.

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  • Dossier Échos de Turquie ÉchoGéo 16

    Les chercheurs de l'Observatoire Urbain d'Istanbul ont coordonné la préparation du dossier "Échos de Turquie" paru dans le dernier numéro (num. 16, mars/mai 2011) de la revue électronique ÉchoGéo.
    Coordonné par Jean-François Pérouse, ce dossier fait état des recherches menées en Turquie par Cilia Martin, Brian Chauvel, Yoann Morvan, Clémence Petit, İsmet Akova, Süheyla Balcı Akova et Benoît Montabone.

    Chaque article de ce dossier est consultable en texte intégral.

  • Toplumsal Tarih Ekim 2011

    Toplumsal Tarih "IFEA Çalışmaları"
    Ekim 2011, n. 214.
    Cilia Martin
    "İsimler ve sınırlar : Kurtuluş'ta mekânsal kullanımlar"

  • Toplumsal Tarih octobre 2011

    Toplumsal Tarih "IFEA Çalışmaları"
    Ekim 2011, n. 214.
    Cilia Martin
    "İsimler ve sınırlar : Kurtuluş'ta mekânsal kullanımlar"

  • Urszula Woźniak - Shifting sensitivities in the diverse mahalle spaces of neoliberal Istanbul - 11/7/2016

    Dans le cadre des intervention des boursiers de courte durée de l'IFEA
    Lundi 11 juillet 2016 à 15h30 à l'IFEA
    Urszula Woźniak (Université de Humboldt)
    Intervention en anglais

    Shifting sensitivities in the diverse mahalle spaces of neoliberal Istanbul

    In this presentation, I want to shed light on the negotiation of “sensitivities” (hassasiyet) in the new landscapes of not only ethnically diverse, but also sexual and gendered mahalle spaces of today’s Istanbul. The neighbourhoods of Tophane and Kurtuluş, two mahalle which allegedly mirror the two ends of a moral axis, reflect the complexity of the current political transformations that have been shaping both Turkey as a whole and Istanbul in particular. With my analysis of neighbourhood-based battles over norms and values, I want to examine how the mounting level of polarizing public moral talk reverberates in the making of the two neighbourhood spaces, which I analyse. Instead of re-applying the Islamic-Secular dichotomy or the Muslim or gay binary (Puar 2007) as categories of analysis that obscure the multiplicity of conflicts and interests at stake, I want to contribute to the discussion on how to investigate moral antagonisms and cases of violence beyond established analytical frameworks.